Featured Product

Water Saving Showerheads

October 8th, 2009
By Scott
Water Saving Evolve Shower Head

Water Saving Evolve Shower Head

You can save more than $200 every year with this product alone!*

ConserveIQ knows that you want to save. That’s why we have the products that conserve your money and save your natural resources along the way!

Have you ever thought about how much water your showerhead uses? Did you know that it could be as much as 2.5 gallons of water per minute?

If you’re like most of us, you’ll turn on the shower and let the water run to allow the hot water to travel from the water heater to the shower.

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Bathroom Products, Water Savings

Lead Paint Professor: Expert on Lead-Based Paint Regulations, Training, and Equipment

October 22nd, 2010
By Scott
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Lead Paint Professor: Expert on Lead-Based Paint Regulations, Training, and Equipment

Go to www.leadpaintprofessor.com to get the latest information on the EPA’s Lead-Based Paint Regulations.  The Lead Paint Professor website is your source for everything regarding lead-based paint.

At www.leadpaintprofessor.com, you can learn about:

  • The EPA’s Renovation, Repair, and Painting Rule (RRP Rule),
  • The Health Hazards of Lead,
  • Lead-Based Paint Inspections, Risk Assessments, and Clearance Examinations,
  • How to Take the Required Certified Renovator Training,
  • How to Register a Certified Firm,
  • What Equipment is Necessary to Properly Perform RRP Rule Renovations,
  • What Documentation is Required by the RRP Rule,
  • Requesting Training in Your Specific Area, and
  • Many Other Topics Pertinent to Lead-Based Paint.

Please visit www.leadpaintprofessor.com today.

Posted in Bathroom Products, Energy Saving Products, Energy Savings, General Products, Healthier Living, Kitchen Products, Lead-Based Paint Regulations, Other, Renovations, Sealant Products, Sustainability, Uncategorized, Water Savings

Updated Article for Contractors: RRP Rule Violators Beware–The New Lead-Based Paint Rule and How It Affects You

October 18th, 2010
By Scott
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RRP Rule-Violators Beware
The New Lead-Based Paint Rule and How It Affects You
By Scott von Gonten, CGA, CGP, LLRA, CR, CDST

Many of our fellow contractors are currently violating the EPA’s Renovation, Repair, and Painting Rule (RRP Rule). That’s because they have either not heard of this new Federal Regulation or have heard about it, but are very confused about its details. In fact, there has been so much misleading, and completely false, information published about this RRP Rule, no wonder people are frustrated. This article will help you and other contractors clearly understand the RRP Rule and have a reliable resource for accurate answers.
Do you remodel, renovate, repair, or paint “Target Housing” or “Child-Occupied Facilities,” built before 1978, to make them more comfortable, energy-efficient, or “roomy?” Specifically, consider the following:
• Do you paint?
• Do you do “Weatherization” improvements?
• Do you install new energy-efficient windows or doors?
• Do you install siding or trim?
• Do you do room additions?
• Do you perform electrical, plumbing, or HVAC services that would involve cutting any holes in your clients’ walls or ceilings?
• Would any of your remodeling activities require the removal of baseboards or other moulding?
• Would any of your roofing projects require your clients’ painted drip edge or fascia to be disturbed or removed?
• Do you do “handyman” activities or maintain rental property?
• Do you disturb paint in any way?

If any of these conditions apply, the EPA’s Renovation, Repair, and Painting Rule affects you. It became enforceable on April 22, 2010. This Rule is targeted at reducing your, and your clients’, exposure to Lead-Based Paint Dust generated by traditional renovation work. The Renovation, Repair, and Painting Rule (RRP Rule) requires that all renovations, of Pre-1978 Target Housing or Child-Occupied Facilities, performed for compensation, must be conducted by a Certified Firm using Certified Renovators. That applies to you AND all of the sub-contractors that you hire to perform your renovations.
This RRP Rule requires Certified Firms and the specially-trained Certified Renovators to do their lead-safe work practices in a very specific way and to maintain very specific records and paperwork for 3 years, since the EPA can demand to see those records up to 3 years in the past. If those records are missing or incomplete or show violations of this RRP Rule, the EPA is allowed to fine that violator so much money—up to $37,500.00 per violation per day— it will likely cause significant financial issues.

Three-Year “Window of Liability”
If a contractor erroneously thinks he or she can “get away” with not complying with the RRP Rule and is disturbing over 6 square feet of paint inside per room, or over 20 square feet outside, on any Pre-1978 target housing or child-occupied facility, there is a 3-year “Window of Liability” during which he or she will have to worry about getting caught violating the regulation. Now, THAT would be stressful! In addition to EPA field investigators, such as those who investigate storm water violations, the EPA will rely on homeowners and other concerned citizens to report violators to the Lead Hotline at (800) 424-LEAD (5323).

Why is Lead Such a Hazard?

Lead is a very hazardous material that can cause great harm to humans, especially children. Although lead-based paint was banned from residential use in 1978, approximately 38 million Pre-1978 homes contain this hazard.

Lead is toxic, when ingested or inhaled, and can cause children to develop learning disabilities and behavioral problems, such as hyperactivity, and can even reduce their IQ. Do you know any children with these issues? In addition to nervous system damage, lead can cause hearing damage, kidney problems, and decreased muscle and bone growth, among other issues. Even pregnant women, who ingest or inhale lead dust, can transfer lead to their babies in the womb, which can cause developmental issues. Obviously, these lead-induced problems can negatively affect children for the rest of their lives.

Lead-based paint, which is peeling, deteriorating, chalking, or has been disturbed, is a common source of paint chips and dust, both inside a home and in soil. Children typically ingest lead dust during normal play activities because they often put their lead-contaminated hands, fingers, and toys in their mouths. Depending on diet and nutrition, children can absorb a very high percentage of lead, which can accumulate in the human body, especially in the bones where it can remain for decades.

Even children who seem healthy may have lead poisoning. Thus, it is often misdiagnosed. The only sure way to determine if a child has lead poisoning is to have his or her medical provider conduct a Blood Lead Level Test.

Adults can also be affected by lead. When lead dust is inhaled or ingested, adults can develop high blood pressure and hypertension, kidney problems, digestive issues, memory and concentration problems, anger management problems, gout, and joint and muscle aches, among other conditions. Does that sound familiar?

Lead poisoning is, however, preventable. During a renovation, when you minimize the creation of lead-based paint dust, properly contain the dust you do create, and thoroughly clean the dust so that you are in compliance with the RRP Rule, you will reduce lead exposure. In addition to benefitting you, your co-workers, and your clients, think about how many other people your actions will help.

That is why it is important for you to be aware of the hazards of lead, avoid contact with it, avoid exposing your clients to it, and ensure that your renovations are being performed according to the RRP Rule requirements.

New, Confusing “Delay” Grossly Misinterpreted
Although the EPA’s Renovation, Repair, and Painting Rule enforced on April 22, 2010 and was further strengthened on July 6, 2010, the EPA announced a confusing “delay” in the certification requirements on June 18, 2010. However, this announcement did NOT delay the conformance to the Renovation, Repair, and Painting Rule (RRP Rule) requirements. All lead safe work practices, requirements, and record-keeping mandates must still be specifically followed as the RRP Rule states and the EPA will continue to issue fines for violations. Unfortunately, this announcement is going to cause many people to be confused.

The EPA extended the fines deadline to allow Firms to have until October 1, 2010 to “receive” their “approved” Certified Firm certification from the EPA, which can take up to 90 days of processing time as allowed by the RRP Rule. To be clear, the October 1, 2010 deadline is NOT a post mark deadline, it is the date that the “approved” Certified Firm certificate must be “received” back from the EPA. So, this EPA announcement only meant that Firms should have sent in their applications by July 1, 2010 in order to allow for up to 90 days of processing. Beginning on October 1, 2010, the EPA can take enforcement actions for firms not being certified. Remember, even if the firm has not yet received the Certified Firm certificate, the firm must still perform all of the requirements of the RRP Rule. If you need the direct link to the EPA’s Certified Firm application, please contact me or you can research it yourself at www.epa.gov/lead. For your own protection, please do this now.

Additionally, the EPA extended the deadline for individual renovation workers to enroll in a Certified Renovator training class to September 30, 2010 and mandated that the training must be successfully completed by December 31, 2010. However, the EPA still requires all lead safe work practices mandated by the RRP Rule to be followed even if the renovators have not yet taken the training. So, you can see, the “delay” does not mean anything and will just cause confusion.

What To Expect During an RRP Rule-Compliant Renovation

Although the details of the RRP Rule and the Lead Safe Work Practices are covered in detail during our training classes, as an example, you may want to know an overview of some very basic information about what happens during a proper renovation of a Pre-1978 home, with Lead-Based Paint, conducted under the RRP Rule.

It is assumed that your company is a Certified Firm, already approved by the EPA, otherwise you would be violating the RRP Rule Regulation and risking fines.

• You are required to assign a Certified Renovator to each renovation project. Your company may need several Certified Renovators to handle all of your jobs.

• You and your Certified Renovator must thoroughly KNOW the RRP Rule as well as when it applies to your projects AND when it does not apply to your projects.

• You must deliver free copies of the “Renovate Right” pamphlet to specific people, and document that delivery, within a certain amount of days prior to the start of your renovation project. That has been the regulation since December 2008 and the number of days in advance differs whether or not Federal Funds are involved.

• Your assigned Certified Renovator must train all non-certified workers and document that training.

• Your Certified Renovator must perform specific tests for Lead-Based Paint in the area of your renovation or hire a third-party professional to do Paint Chip Sampling or use an X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Analyzer to determine if there is Lead-Based Paint present.

• Your Certified Renovator must put up warning signs and notify the residents to keep out of the work area.

• Your Certified Renovator must supervise the installation of the required containment to keep the dust, which is generated during the renovation, inside the work area. The RRP Rule requires that all work area windows, HVAC ducts, and doors must be sealed and that one door should have a special double door flap installed to allow access to the work area. Impermeable plastic sheeting should cover the work area a certain distance from the surface being renovated, which differs if the renovation is inside or outside.

• Comply with all recommendations for Personal Protective Equipment for your Certified Renovator and trained workers. It is crucially important that NO dust is taken out of the work area.

• Ensure that the 3 EPA Prohibited Practices are NOT used at any time. There are 3 additional Prohibited Practices if HUD Rules apply.

• Ensure that your work area is stringently cleaned every day using a HEPA Vacuum and Wet Wipes.

• Ensure that all waste from the work area is bagged or wrapped in a very special way and then thoroughly cleaned with a HEPA vacuum before leaving the work area and being stored in a secure area. You must comply with all local environmental regulations for waste.

• After you have disturbed all of the paint you are going to disturb, which includes sanding or scraping, removing moulding or other components, demolition, or any other modification, your Certified Renovator must supervise a final thorough cleaning using very special procedures.

• Your Certified Renovator must perform a detailed visual inspection and re-clean if necessary.

• Your Certified Renovator must perform an official Cleaning Verification, using specific procedures, or have a Clearance Examination performed by a Licensed Lead Risk Assessor, Licensed Lead Inspector, or Certified Dust Sampling Technician.

• Provide specific people with a Post-Renovation Report, which will contain the results of your lead paint testing and a checklist of all of the steps of the RRP Rule to which you had to comply. This must be given within a certain timeframe depending on EPA or HUD requirements.

• Collect and maintain all records for 3 years as an EPA requirement or more, if you choose, for civil liability.

The EPA’s RRP Rule contains a multitude of very specific requirements that are reviewed in detail during the training. It is extremely important that you know and completely understand these requirements for you, your Certified Renovator, and your trained workers to work safely with lead-based paint.

Your Competitive Advantage

When you receive your Certified Firm approval from the EPA, I highly recommend that you actively publicize that you are a Certified Firm and, after you successfully complete our Certified Renovator Training, let everyone know that you are a Certified Renovator. Put your certification information on your business cards, letterhead, e-mails, signs, sales presentations, website, and all correspondence.

Once you are certified, if any of your potential clients in Pre-1978 Target Housing or Child-Occupied Facilities are receiving multiple bids, make sure they clearly understand that you are legally compliant with the RRP Rule and that ALL other contractors, who are bidding on the job, must be Certified Firms with a Certified Renovator assigned to the job, otherwise, they are violating the RRP Rule regulations and exposing clients, and their families, to lead-based paint hazards.

In addition to contacting me for helpful information, you can go to www.epa.gov/lead or call (800) 424-LEAD (5323) for lead data. Additionally, you can get some great information from the National Center for Healthy Housing at www.nchh.org or ConserveIQ at www.conserveiq.com. You can also call (713) 213-1205 with any questions.

Working safely with lead-based paint is very possible when you know the RRP Rule and closely follow its requirements. Reduce your risk and liability. Avoid costly fines. Do the right thing. Help to eliminate lead poisoning from lead-based paint dust while gaining a Competitive Advantage in your market.

Article by Scott von Gonten, CGA, CGP, LLRA, CR, CDST with ConserveIQ, LLC. Providing you with Licensed Lead Risk Assessments, Lead Inspections, Clearance Examinations, and Consulting as well as the most accurate, effective, and memorable Certified Renovator Training and Certified Dust Sampling Technician Training available. ConserveIQ is partnering with the National Center for Healthy Housing, an EPA-accredited training provider, to present Certified Renovator and Certified Dust Sampling Technician training Nationwide. Scott is a Licensed Lead Risk Assessor and Principal Instructor for NCHH, and a member of the NAHB Society of Honored Associates, the Faculty of the NAHB University of Housing, the Certified Graduate Builder Board of Governors, the NAHB University of Housing Instructor Review Board, the NAHB Associate Members Committee and Designations and Training Sub-Committee, the GHBA Executive Committee, the Boards of Directors for NAHB, TAB, BABA, and GABRA, as well as many other boards, councils, and committees at the national, state, and local levels. You can contact him at svongonten@conserveiq.com or (713) 213-1205. Take the “ConserveIQ Quiz” at www.ConserveIQ.com.

Posted in General Products, Healthier Living, Lead-Based Paint Regulations, Other, Renovations, Uncategorized

Homeowner Alert–The New Lead-Based Paint Rule and How It Affects You

August 4th, 2010
By Scott
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Homeowner Alert–The New Lead-Based Paint Rule and How It Affects You

By Scott von Gonten, CGA, CGP, LLRA, CR, CDST

Do you live in a home built before 1978?

Do you want to do some remodeling to make your home more comfortable, energy-efficient, or “roomy?” If so, consider the following:
• Does your home need repainting?
• Do you need some “Weatherization” improvements?
• Do you need new energy-efficient windows or doors installed?
• Does your siding or trim need to be replaced?
• Do you need a room addition?
• Do you need some electrical, plumbing, or heating/ventilation/air conditioning work done that would involve cutting holes in your walls or ceilings?
• Would any remodeling activity require the removal of baseboards or other moulding?
• Would a roofing project require the drip edge or fascia to be disturbed or removed?

If any of these conditions apply, there is a new regulation that affects you. It is called the Environmental Protection Agency’s Renovation, Repair, and Painting Rule, which became enforceable on April 22, 2010. This Rule is targeted at reducing your, and your family’s, exposure to Lead-Based Paint Dust generated by traditional renovation work. The Renovation, Repair, and Painting Rule (RRP Rule) requires that any renovation of your home, which you pay for, must be conducted by a Certified Firm using Certified Renovators.

This rule requires Certified Firms and the specially-trained Certified Renovators to do their lead-safe work practices in a very specific way and to maintain very specific records and paperwork for up to 3 years. The EPA can demand to see those records up to 3 years in the past. If those records are missing or incomplete or show violations of this RRP Rule, the EPA is allowed to fine that violator so much money, it will likely put that company out of business.

Why is Lead Such a Hazard?

Lead is a very hazardous material that can cause great harm to humans, especially children. Although lead-based paint was banned from residential use in 1978, approximately 38 million Pre-1978 homes contain this hazard.

Lead is toxic, when ingested or inhaled, and can cause children to develop learning disabilities and behavioral problems, such as hyperactivity, and can even reduce their IQ. In addition to nervous system damage, lead can cause hearing damage, kidney problems, and decreased muscle and bone growth, among other issues. Even pregnant women, who ingest or inhale lead dust, can transfer lead to their babies in the womb, which can cause developmental issues. Obviously, these lead-induced problems can negatively affect children for the rest of their lives.

Lead-based paint, which is peeling, deteriorating, chalking, or has been disturbed, is a common source of paint chips and dust, both inside a home and in soil. Children typically ingest lead dust during normal play activities because they often put their lead-contaminated hands, fingers, and toys in their mouths.

Even children who seem healthy may have lead poisoning. The only sure way to determine if a child has lead poisoning is to have your medical provider conduct a Blood Lead Level Test.

Adults can also be affected by lead. When lead dust is inhaled or ingested, adults can develop high blood pressure, hypertension, kidney problems, digestive issues, memory and concentration problems, and joint and muscle aches, among other conditions.

Lead poisoning is, however, completely preventable. That is why it is important for you to be aware of the hazards of lead, avoid contact with it, and ensure that your renovation is being performed by a Certified Firm using Certified Renovators.

New, Confusing “Delay” Announced

Although the EPA’s Renovation, Repair, and Painting Rule enforced on April 22, 2010 and was further strengthened on July 6, 2010, the EPA announced a confusing “delay” in the certification requirements on June 18, 2010. However, this announcement did NOT delay the conformance to the Renovation, Repair, and Painting Rule (RRP Rule) requirements. All lead safe work practices, requirements, and record-keeping mandates must still be specifically followed as the RRP Rule states and the EPA will continue to issue fines for violations. Unfortunately, this announcement is going to cause many people to be confused.

The EPA will now allow Firms to have until October 1, 2010 to “receive” their “approved” Certified Firm certification from the EPA, which can take up to 90 days of processing time as allowed by the RRP Rule. To be clear, the October 1, 2010 deadline is NOT a post mark deadline, it is the date that the “approved” Certified Firm certificate must be “received” back from the EPA. So, Firms should send in their applications right now in order to allow for up to 90 days of processing. After October 1, 2010, the EPA can take enforcement actions for firms not being certified. Remember, even if the firm has not yet received the Certified Firm certificate, the firm must still perform all of the requirements of the RRP Rule.

Additionally, the EPA extended the deadline for individual renovation workers to enroll in a Certified Renovator training class to September 30, 2010 and mandated that the training must be successfully completed by December 31, 2010. However, the EPA still requires all lead safe work practices mandated by the RRP Rule to be followed even if the renovators have not yet taken the training. So, you can see, the “delay” will just cause confusion.

What To Expect During a Renovation

You may want to know some information about what happens during a proper renovation of a Pre-1978 home, with Lead-Based Paint, conducted under the RRP Rule. The information you need will be covered in the Renovate Right pamphlet, but here are some brief points:

• You will need to move everything that can be moved out of the room or area being renovated.

• Your Certified Renovator will need to do several things to prepare for and conduct the renovation:

o Put up caution signs to identify the work area as hazardous and for everyone, except the Certified Renovator and his or her trained workers, to stay out (this is very important for you, your family, and any pets).

o Put up a double door flap, made out of plastic sheeting and tape, over the work area’s exit door.

o Seal off all of the other doors, windows, and heating and cooling vents and returns with plastic sheeting and tape (you may also need to turn off the heating or cooling system during the renovation).

o Cover any remaining heavy objects in the room with plastic.

o Put down plastic sheeting on the floor and otherwise contain the hazardous renovation area in order to keep any dust that is produced inside the containment area.

o Use paint removal methods that minimize the dust being created but should never use the Prohibited Practices, which are explained in your Renovate Right pamphlet.

o Use specialized cleaning techniques to clean the work area such as using a HEPA vacuum and disposable wet wipes

Once again, consult the Renovate Right pamphlet for more information on what to expect during a renovation.

Please Keep Your Family Safe

If you are a homeowner considering any type of remodeling or renovation project on your Pre-1978 home, please make sure you are keeping yourself and your family protected from lead-based paint hazards. Please ensure that any contractor you get a bid from or hire to perform the work is a “Certified Firm” and has a “Certified Renovator” assigned to your project. Additionally, prior to the beginning of your renovation project, you must receive a free copy of the “Renovate Right” pamphlet from your contractor and, after your renovation project, you must receive a free copy of the post-renovation disclosure from your contractor, which lets you know how the Certified Firm complied with the RRP Rule.

You can go to www.epa.gov/lead or call 1-800-424-LEAD (5323) for lead data. Additionally, you can get some great information from the National Center for Healthy Housing at www.nchh.org.

This information is important for you and your family. Please keep informed about the Renovation, Repair, and Painting Rule and its requirements to help prevent lead poisoning.

Article by Scott von Gonten, CGA, CGP, LLRA, CR, CDST with ConserveIQ, LLC. Providing you with Licensed Lead Risk Assessments, Lead Inspections, Clearance Examinations, and Consulting as well as the most accurate, effective, and memorable Certified Renovator Training and Certified Dust Sampling Technician Training available. ConserveIQ is partnering with the National Center for Healthy Housing, an EPA-accredited training provider, to present Certified Renovator and Certified Dust Sampling Technician training Nationwide. Scott is a Licensed Lead Risk Assessor and Principal Instructor for NCHH, and a member of the NAHB Society of Honored Associates, the Faculty of the NAHB University of Housing, the Certified Graduate Builder Board of Governors, the NAHB University of Housing Instructor Review Board, the NAHB Associate Members Committee and Designations and Training Sub-Committee, the GHBA Executive Committee, the Boards of Directors for NAHB, TAB, BABA, and GABRA, as well as many other boards, councils, and committees at the national, state, and local levels. You can contact him at svongonten@conserveiq.com or (713) 213-1205. Take the “ConserveIQ Quiz” at www.ConserveIQ.com.

Posted in Healthier Living, Lead-Based Paint Regulations, Renovations

RRP Rule-Violators Beware–The New Lead-Based Paint Rule and How It Affects You

August 4th, 2010
By Scott
Comments Off

RRP Rule-Violators Beware
The New Lead-Based Paint Rule and How It Affects You

By Scott von Gonten, CGA, CGP, LLRA, CR, CDST

Do you remodel, renovate, repair, or paint “Target Housing” or “Child-Occupied Facilities,” built before 1978, to make them more comfortable, energy-efficient, or “roomy?” Specifically, consider the following:
• Do you paint?
• Do you do “Weatherization” improvements?
• Do you install new energy-efficient windows or doors?
• Do you install siding or trim?
• Do you do room additions?
• Do you perform electrical, plumbing, or HVAC services that would involve cutting any holes in your clients’ walls or ceilings?
• Would any of your remodeling activities require the removal of baseboards or other moulding?
• Would any of your roofing projects require your clients’ drip edge or fascia to be disturbed or removed?
• Do you do “handyman” activities or maintain rental property?
• Do you disturb paint in any way?

If any of these conditions apply, there is a new regulation that affects you. It is called the Environmental Protection Agency’s Renovation, Repair, and Painting Rule, which became enforceable on April 22, 2010. This Rule is targeted at reducing your, and your clients’, exposure to Lead-Based Paint Dust generated by traditional renovation work. The Renovation, Repair, and Painting Rule (RRP Rule) requires that all renovations, of Pre-1978 Target Housing or Child-Occupied Facilities, performed for compensation, must be conducted by a Certified Firm using Certified Renovators. That applies to you AND all of the sub-contractors that you hire to perform your renovations.

This RRP Rule requires Certified Firms and the specially-trained Certified Renovators to do their lead-safe work practices in a very specific way and to maintain very specific records and paperwork for 3 years, since the EPA can demand to see those records up to 3 years in the past. If those records are missing or incomplete or show violations of this RRP Rule, the EPA is allowed to fine that violator so much money—up to $37,500.00 per violation per day— it will likely cause significant financial issues.

Do you know any contractors who are violating the EPA’s Renovation, Repair, and Painting Rule right now?

If so, they are facing those HUGE fines that could wipe them out financially! Remember, the EPA can legally investigate a renovating company’s records up to 3 years in the past. Therefore, if a contractor erroneously thinks he or she can “get away” with not complying with the RRP Rule and is disturbing over 6 square feet of paint on any Pre-1978 target housing or child-occupied facility right now, there is a 3-year “Window of Liability” during which he or she will have to worry about getting caught violating the regulation. Now, THAT would be stressful! The EPA will be actively looking for violators because the fines provide for the self-funding of the RRP Rule bureaucracy.

Why is Lead Such a Hazard?

Lead is a very hazardous material that can cause great harm to humans, especially children. Although lead-based paint was banned from residential use in 1978, approximately 38 million Pre-1978 homes contain this hazard.

Lead is toxic, when ingested or inhaled, and can cause children to develop learning disabilities and behavioral problems, such as hyperactivity, and can even reduce their IQ. Do you know any children with these issues? In addition to nervous system damage, lead can cause hearing damage, kidney problems, and decreased muscle and bone growth, among other issues. Even pregnant women, who ingest or inhale lead dust, can transfer lead to their babies in the womb, which can cause developmental issues. Obviously, these lead-induced problems can negatively affect children for the rest of their lives.

Lead-based paint, which is peeling, deteriorating, chalking, or has been disturbed, is a common source of paint chips and dust, both inside a home and in soil. Children typically ingest lead dust during normal play activities because they often put their lead-contaminated hands, fingers, and toys in their mouths. Depending on diet and nutrition, children can absorb a very high percentage of lead, which can accumulate in the human body, especially in the bones where it can remain for decades.

Even children who seem healthy may have lead poisoning. Thus, it is often misdiagnosed. The only sure way to determine if a child has lead poisoning is to have his or her medical provider conduct a Blood Lead Level Test.

Adults can also be affected by lead. When lead dust is inhaled or ingested, adults can develop high blood pressure and hypertension, kidney problems, digestive issues, memory and concentration problems, anger management problems, and joint and muscle aches, among other conditions.

Lead poisoning is, however, preventable. During a renovation, when you minimize the creation of lead-based paint dust, properly contain the dust you do create, and thoroughly clean the dust so that you are in compliance with the RRP Rule, you will reduce lead exposure. In addition to benefitting you, your co-workers, and your clients, think about how many other people your actions will help.

In total, how many children will not be lead-poisoned because you are complying with the lead safe work practices? How many children will have better lives because of your positive actions?

That is why it is important for you to be aware of the hazards of lead, avoid contact with it, avoid exposing your clients to it, and ensure that your renovations are being performed according to the RRP Rule requirements.

New, Confusing “Delay” Announced

Although the EPA’s Renovation, Repair, and Painting Rule enforced on April 22, 2010 and was further strengthened on July 6, 2010, the EPA announced a confusing “delay” in the certification requirements on June 18, 2010. However, this announcement did NOT delay the conformance to the Renovation, Repair, and Painting Rule (RRP Rule) requirements. All lead safe work practices, requirements, and record-keeping mandates must still be specifically followed as the RRP Rule states and the EPA will continue to issue fines for violations. Unfortunately, this announcement is going to cause many people to be confused.

The EPA will now allow Firms to have until October 1, 2010 to “receive” their “approved” Certified Firm certification from the EPA, which can take up to 90 days of processing time as allowed by the RRP Rule. To be clear, the October 1, 2010 deadline is NOT a post mark deadline, it is the date that the “approved” Certified Firm certificate must be “received” back from the EPA. So, Firms should send in their applications right now in order to allow for up to 90 days of processing. Beginning on October 1, 2010, the EPA can take enforcement actions for firms not being certified. Remember, even if the firm has not yet received the Certified Firm certificate, the firm must still perform all of the requirements of the RRP Rule. Here is the direct link to the EPA’s Certified Firm application. Please contact me for more information. For your own protection, please do this now.

Additionally, the EPA extended the deadline for individual renovation workers to enroll in a Certified Renovator training class to September 30, 2010 and mandated that the training must be successfully completed by December 31, 2010. However, the EPA still requires all lead safe work practices mandated by the RRP Rule to be followed even if the renovators have not yet taken the training. So, you can see, the “delay” does not mean anything and will just cause confusion.

What To Expect During an RRP Rule-Compliant Renovation

Although the details of the RRP Rule and the Lead Safe Work Practices are covered in detail during our training classes, as an example, you may want to know an overview of some very basic information about what happens during a proper renovation of a Pre-1978 home, with Lead-Based Paint, conducted under the RRP Rule.

It is assumed that your company is a Certified Firm, already approved by the EPA, otherwise you would be violating the RRP Rule Regulation and risking fines.

• You are required to assign a Certified Renovator to each renovation project.

• You and your Certified Renovator must thoroughly KNOW the RRP Rule as well as when it applies to your projects AND when it does not apply to your projects.

• You must deliver free copies of the “Renovate Right” pamphlet to specific people, and document that delivery, within a certain amount of days prior to the start of your renovation project. That has been the regulation since December 2008 and the number of days in advance differs whether or not Federal Funds are involved.

• Your assigned Certified Renovator must train all non-certified workers and document that training.

• Your Certified Renovator must perform specific tests for Lead-Based Paint in the area of your renovation or hire a third-party professional to do Paint Chip Sampling or use an X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Analyzer to determine if there is Lead-Based Paint present.

• Your Certified Renovator must put up warning signs and notify the residents to keep out of the work area.

• Your Certified Renovator must supervise the installation of the required containment to keep the dust, which is generated during the renovation, inside the work area. The RRP Rule requires that all work area windows, HVAC ducts, and doors must be sealed and that one door should have a special double door flap installed to allow access to the work area. Impermeable plastic sheeting should cover the work area a certain distance from the surface being renovated, which differs if the renovation is inside or outside.

• Comply with all recommendations for Personal Protective Equipment for your Certified Renovator and trained workers. It is crucially important that NO dust is taken out of the work area.

• Ensure that the 3 EPA Prohibited Practices are NOT used at any time. There are 3 additional Prohibited Practices if HUD Rules apply.

• Ensure that your work area is stringently cleaned every day using a HEPA Vacuum and Wet Wipes.

• Ensure that all waste from the work area is bagged or wrapped in a very special way and then thoroughly cleaned with a HEPA vacuum before leaving the work area and being stored in a secure area. You must comply with all local environmental regulations for waste.

• After you have disturbed all of the paint you are going to disturb, which includes sanding or scraping, removing moulding or other components, demolition, or any other modification, your Certified Renovator must supervise a final thorough cleaning using very special procedures.

• Your Certified Renovator must perform a detailed visual inspection and re-clean if necessary.

• Your Certified Renovator must perform an official Cleaning Verification, using specific procedures, or have a Clearance Examination performed by a Licensed Lead Risk Assessor, Licensed Lead Inspector, or Certified Dust Sampling Technician.

• Provide specific people with a Post-Renovation Report, which will contain the results of your lead paint testing and a checklist of all of the steps of the RRP Rule to which you had to comply. This must be given within a certain timeframe depending on EPA or HUD requirements.

• Collect and maintain all records for 3 years as an EPA requirement or more, if you choose, for civil liability.

The EPA’s RRP Rule contains a multitude of very specific requirements that are reviewed in detail during the training. It is extremely important that you know and completely understand these requirements for you, your Certified Renovator, and your trained workers to work safely with lead-based paint.

Please Keep Everyone Safe During and After Renovations

If you are performing any type of remodeling or renovation projects on Pre-1978 Target Housing or Child-Occupied Facilities, please make sure you are keeping yourself, your co-workers, and your clients protected from lead-based paint hazards.

When you receive your Certified Firm approval from the EPA, I highly recommend that you actively publicize that you are a Certified Firm and, after you successfully complete our Certified Renovator Training, let everyone know that you are a Certified Renovator. Put your certification information on your business cards, letterhead, e-mails, signs, sales presentations, website, and all correspondence.

Once you are certified, if any of your potential clients in Pre-1978 Target Housing or Child-Occupied Facilities are receiving multiple bids, make sure they clearly understand that you are legally compliant with the RRP Rule and that ALL other contractors who are bidding on the job must be Certified Firms with a Certified Renovator assigned to the job or they are violating the RRP Rule regulations and exposing clients, and their families, to lead-based paint hazards.

In addition to contacting me for helpful information, you can go to www.epa.gov/lead or call 1-800-424-LEAD (5323) for lead data. Additionally, you can get some great information from the National Center for Healthy Housing at www.nchh.org.

This information is important for you, your co-workers, and your clients, as well as all of the related families. Working safely with lead-based paint is very possible when you know the RRP Rule and closely follow its requirements. Reduce your risk and liability. Avoid costly fines. Do the right thing. Help to eliminate lead poisoning from lead-based paint dust.

Article by Scott von Gonten, CGA, CGP, LLRA, CR, CDST with ConserveIQ, LLC. Providing you with Licensed Lead Risk Assessments, Lead Inspections, Clearance Examinations, and Consulting as well as the most accurate, effective, and memorable Certified Renovator Training and Certified Dust Sampling Technician Training available. ConserveIQ is partnering with the National Center for Healthy Housing, an EPA-accredited training provider, to present Certified Renovator and Certified Dust Sampling Technician training Nationwide. Scott is a Licensed Lead Risk Assessor and Principal Instructor for NCHH, and a member of the NAHB Society of Honored Associates, the Faculty of the NAHB University of Housing, the Certified Graduate Builder Board of Governors, the NAHB University of Housing Instructor Review Board, the NAHB Associate Members Committee and Designations and Training Sub-Committee, the GHBA Executive Committee, the Boards of Directors for NAHB, TAB, BABA, and GABRA, as well as many other boards, councils, and committees at the national, state, and local levels. You can contact him at svongonten@conserveiq.com or (713) 213-1205. Take the “ConserveIQ Quiz” at www.ConserveIQ.com.

Posted in Healthier Living, Lead-Based Paint Regulations, Renovations

Caroma Dual Flush Toilets with 4″ Trapway

November 5th, 2009
By Scott

Caroma Toilet

What are you flushing down the toilet? Is it your money?

Do your toilets waste far too much water? We know, you say that the standard 1.6 gallons per flush toilets ought to save water, but how many times do you “Double Flush” or “Hold the Lever Down” to let more water flow to avoid those incessant blockages? (You know you do it.) A recent survey at a local home show showed that over 61% of people Double Flush and/or Hold the Lever Down. And those were just the people who admitted it.

You are innocent!

Remember, toilet clogs are NOT YOUR FAULT! Toilet clogs are the fault of the standard toilet’s poor design based on siphonic tubes! At ConserveIQ, we have a modern toilet called Caroma, which is redesigned for effective flushing and water savings and, most importantly, it works because it is NOT siphonic. We suggest changing your toilets to Caromas and throwing your plunger away!

You get to Choose…

Plus, all Caroma Toilets are Dual Flush Toilets. That means your Caroma Toilet has two buttons instead of a lever, and it gives you a great way to save thousands of gallons of water by choosing a 1.6 gallon full flush when you need it (bulk) or only 0.8 gallon half flush for lighter requirements (liquid). With Caromas, you will be able to save between 40%-80% of your toilet water usage and have more effective flushes. And effective flushes contribute to a happy life!

Read on for more details…

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Posted in Bathroom Products, Water Savings

Attic Breeze Solar Powered Attic Fans

October 19th, 2009
By Scott
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Is that an attic or an oven?

Have you noticed how hot your attic is? It’s like an oven in there! The heat from the sun is absorbed by your roof shingles and transferred into your attic. That makes your entire attic a sweltering collection of hot air.

That hot air in your attic not only surrounds your air conditioner ducts, making them less effective, but also transfers heat into your home and makes your entire air conditioner system work even harder to keep your home cool.

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Posted in Energy Saving Products, Energy Savings

Silver Line Windows from ConserveIQ

October 19th, 2009
By Scott
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Silver Line Windows, an Anderson company, has been producing windows and doors since 1947 and offers a Limited Lifetime Warranty on all products. There are many windows from which to choose, including a full assortment of double hung windows.

After installation of your new Silver Line Windows, you will begin to see the difference in energy usage and how quiet your home is. All Silver Line Windows are insulated and have double panes of glass to keep all those outside elements where they need to stay…outside!

Remember, Federal Tax Credits will apply for Silver Line windows from ConserveIQ!

Posted in Energy Saving Products, Energy Savings

WaterMiser WaterBrooms

October 19th, 2009
By Scott

Watermiser Waterbrooms

Watermiser Waterbrooms

How do you clean your driveway or sidewalk? Do you ever have to clean a parking lot or tennis court or pool surround? Wow, how long does that take you?

Do you use a hose and nozzle or a pressure sprayer? How much water does that use? How do you handle all of the water runoff?

How would you like to clean your surfaces faster and use very little water so that everything dries more quickly?

WaterBroom to the rescue!

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Posted in Bathroom Products, Water Savings

GreenSeries Low-VOC Caulks, Adhesives, and Expanding Foams

October 19th, 2009
By Scott

How do you stop all those leaky areas around your doors, windows, moulding, and electrical outlets? If you feel air blowing from or into those areas, you are bringing unfiltered air into your home. But how do you stop the leaks?

Use GreenSeries Low-VOC Caulks, Adhesives, and Expanding Foams to seal those leaks.

For healthy Indoor Air Quality, it is extremely important to use Low-VOC products. Even though GreenSeries products are Low-VOC, they exceed the adhesive performance and sealant performance of the competitors’ unhealthy products. In addition, GreenSeries products can lower the amount of adhesive- and sealant-related VOCs in a home by about 98% as compared to using traditional products!

When you can retain performance strength and eliminate that many VOCs to improve your indoor air quality, using GreenSeries products is a “no brainer!” Call ConserveIQ today for GreenSeries Caulks, Adhesives, and Expanding Foams.

Posted in Healthier Living, Sealant Products