Caroma Dual Flush Toilets with 4″ Trapway

November 5th, 2009
By Scott

Caroma Toilet

What are you flushing down the toilet? Is it your money?

Do your toilets waste far too much water? We know, you say that the standard 1.6 gallons per flush toilets ought to save water, but how many times do you “Double Flush” or “Hold the Lever Down” to let more water flow to avoid those incessant blockages? (You know you do it.) A recent survey at a local home show showed that over 61% of people Double Flush and/or Hold the Lever Down. And those were just the people who admitted it.

You are innocent!

Remember, toilet clogs are NOT YOUR FAULT! Toilet clogs are the fault of the standard toilet’s poor design based on siphonic tubes! At ConserveIQ, we have a modern toilet called Caroma, which is redesigned for effective flushing and water savings and, most importantly, it works because it is NOT siphonic. We suggest changing your toilets to Caromas and throwing your plunger away!

You get to Choose…

Plus, all Caroma Toilets are Dual Flush Toilets. That means your Caroma Toilet has two buttons instead of a lever, and it gives you a great way to save thousands of gallons of water by choosing a 1.6 gallon full flush when you need it (bulk) or only 0.8 gallon half flush for lighter requirements (liquid). With Caromas, you will be able to save between 40%-80% of your toilet water usage and have more effective flushes. And effective flushes contribute to a happy life!

Read on for more details…

What do you hate more…Toilet Clogs or Wasting Water?

The two major problems Americans have with their toilets are 1) poor flushing capacity and clogs due to siphonic tubes and 2) too much water is being wasted with single flush toilets.

PROBLEM #1: Poor Flushing Capacity and Clogs Due to Siphonic Tubes

Do you love your plunger?

Let’s face it, we all dread having to use a plunger. Yet, because of antiquated, outdated, and poorly designed toilets with old-fashioned siphonic tube designs, we are constantly faced with clogs and overflows that wreak havoc upon our lives! Yes, we have all experienced those nasty clogs and messy overflows. Remember, clogs are not your fault, it is the poor designs of most North American toilets, whose designs have not changed much since the 1800’s. A much more effective design originated in 1980, when Bruce Thompson, from Caroma in Australia, developed the Dual Flush cistern and redesigned the toilet bowl to make water saving and flushing effectiveness harmonious! Hallelujah!

Siphonic Technology… It sucks. (Literally and Figuratively)

The siphonic tube is that curly tube design on the side of your toilets that makes a circuitous route from the toilet bowl to the closet flange in your floor, which is the exit to the drain line. In order to work, a siphonic tube has to have a diameter of about 2” in order to properly fill with water, which is discharged ahead of the waste, to create a siphoning action after it reaches and passes the top of the tube and begins to “suck” the column of water through the tube, due to atmospheric pressure. Once the column of water is broken by air, when the water reaches below the first bend in the siphonic tube, the siphonic action stops. You will notice if you have a siphonic toilet by the cacophonous sucking noise associated with sucking air down the tube at the end of the flush.

Although siphonic tubes range in sizes—1-7/8”, 2”, 2-1/8”, or 2-1/4”—a big problem with that little 2-inch-range siphonic tube is that it is prone to clogs or plugs. Everything from the toilet is being forced to go through that little tube and make all kinds of twists and turns in the process. If anyone in your family puts too much toilet paper or other items in the toilet, the toilet can clog. Then, you are forced to use the dreaded plunger! Unfortunately, we have all experienced the misery that is associated with plunger use! Remember, it is not your fault…it’s the poor, old-fashioned, siphonic toilet design. Some manufacturers have begun to add expensive pressure-assisted tanks to force smaller amounts of water up and over that same ineffective siphonic tube. But that is just trying to find new expensive ways to make a poor design work better.

Comparing Caroma

Comparing Caroma

Caroma’s here to save the day!

Do you want a better flush? A better choice is to use the Caroma Dual Flush Toilets from ConserveIQ! Caroma toilets have a 4” trapway (almost double the size of the average trapway) that quickly and effectively discharges the waste with your choice of either 0.8 gallon or 1.6 gallons. With the 4” trapway design and the powerful washdown technology, the Caroma Toilets are virtually clog free.

Also, in an old-fashioned siphonic tube toilet, a lot of the water is discharged ahead of the waste to create the siphon/sucking effect. When a lot of the water goes ahead of the waste, there is usually not enough water behind the waste to properly clear the drain lines, which lead to the sewer. It is not a good idea to have waste sitting in the drain lines. That waste may remain there until the next toilet usage, but then it may be replaced with more waste that cannot complete its final journey down the drain line. What a mess!

A better choice is to use the Caroma Dual Flush Toilets from ConserveIQ! Caroma toilets have a 4” trapway (almost double the size of the average trapway) that quickly and effectively discharges the waste with your choice of either 0.8 gallon or 1.6 gallons. The water quickly flows down the very steep bowl and pushes the waste. Thus, the water is behind the waste and forces it all the way down the drain line to keep the line flushed.

So what is the conclusion? We can confirm that siphonic tubes suck, literally and figuratively.

A better choice is to avoid siphonic toilets altogether and choose the effective Caroma washdown technology available through ConserveIQ! Save water and say “Good-bye” to your plunger!

PROBLEM #2: Too Much Water is Being Wasted with Single Flush Toilets

How much water and money are you flushing down your toilets?

Why would you want to flush 1.6 gallons of water for a liquid flush when 0.8 gallon is plenty? Think about all that water being wasted every time you push the lever! In fact, you can remember how wasteful that antiquated “LEVER” is by remembering this acronym: “L.E.V.E.R.” stands for “Losing Enormous Volumes of Essential Resources!” With lever flushing, you have no choice! At ConserveIQ, we believe in giving you the ability to “choose how much water you use!”

All 41 Caroma Dual Flush Toilets are EPA WaterSense Labeled, which means they have to use at least 20% less water than 1.6 gallons per flush toilets. Of course, Caromas far exceed that 1.28 gallons per flush target. Caroma uses 40% less (.96 gallon per flush average) or 44% less (.89 gallon per flush average), depending on the tank you choose.

By using water-saving toilets, such as Caroma Dual Flush Toilets from ConserveIQ, those with a 0.8 gallon 1/2 flush for liquid and a 1.6 gallon (or even a 1.28 gallon) full flush for bulk, you can save a minimum of 40% of toilet water usage (based on 4 liquid flushes and 1 bulk flush) as compared to a standard 1.6 gallon per flush toilet. However, since most people “double flush” or “hold the lever down,” the water savings is likely much higher than 40%!

You may say, “With Caroma’s 4-inch Trapway, achieving true happiness by not having to use my plunger is compensation enough!” However, you will also save money on your water bill by reducing your water usage!

So, in addition to the nearly perfect bliss of flawless flushing, how much can you expect to save by switching to a Caroma Dual Flush Toilet from ConserveIQ? Let’s take a look…

Real Life Examples…

Let’s say that each member of a family of four flushes 5 times per day (the industry average is comprised of 4 flushes for liquid and 1 flush for bulk, although some people are above average).

We will compare Caroma Dual Flush Toilets from ConserveIQ to the following toilets:

5 Gallons per Flush LEVER toilet
3.5 Gallons per Flush LEVER toilet
1.6 Gallons per Flush LEVER toilet where there are only 2 Double Flushes per family member
1.6 Gallons per Flush LEVER toilet where there is only 1 Double Flush per family member
1.6 Gallons per Flush LEVER toilet and NO ONE EVER Double Flushes

5 Gallon per Flush LEVER toilet (uses 5 gallons per flush on every flush):

(4 liquid flushes x 5 gallons) + (1 bulk flush x 5 gallons) = 25 gallons / day per person

25 gallons / day x 4 people = 100 gallons / day

100 gallons / day x 365 days = 36,500 gallons / year

Caroma Dual Flush Toilet uses 0.8 gallon for liquid and 1.6 gallons for bulk:

(4 liquid flushes x 0.8 gallon) + (1 bulk flush x 1.6 gallons) = 4.8 gallons / day per person

4.8 gallons / day x 4 people = 19.2 gallons / day

19.2 gallons / day x 365 days = 7,008 gallons / year

So, with a Caroma Dual Flush Toilet from ConserveIQ, this family will save 29,492 gallons of water per year! That’s 80.8% water savings!

If this toilet was in Houston, the average cost of residential water is $0.007894026 / gallon, as of September 2009.

That’s 29,492 gallons x $0.007894026 = $232.81

So, by changing to a Caroma Dual Flush Toilet from ConserveIQ, this family will save $232.81 per year!*

3.5 Gallon per Flush LEVER toilet (uses 3.5 gallons per flush on every flush):

(4 liquid flushes x 3.5 gallons) + (1 bulk flush x 3.5 gallons) = 17.5 gallons / day per person

17.5 gallons / day x 4 people = 70 gallons / day

70 gallons / day x 365 days = 25,550 gallons / year

Caroma Dual Flush Toilet uses 0.8 gallon for liquid and 1.6 gallons for bulk:

(4 liquid flushes x 0.8 gallon) + (1 bulk flush x 1.6 gallons) = 4.8 gallons / day per person

4.8 gallons / day x 4 people = 19.2 gallons / day

19.2 gallons / day x 365 days = 7,008 gallons / year

So, with a Caroma Dual Flush Toilet from ConserveIQ, this family will save 18,542 gallons of water per year! That’s 72.5% water savings!

If this toilet was in Houston, the average cost of residential water is $0.007894026 / gallon, as of September 2009.

That’s 18,542 gallons x $0.007894026 = $146.37

So, by changing to a Caroma Dual Flush Toilet from ConserveIQ, this family will save $146.37 per year!*

1.6 Gallons per Flush LEVER toilet where there are only 2 Double Flushes per family member (uses 1.6 gallons per flush on every flush):

(4 liquid flushes x 1.6 gallons) + (1 bulk flush x 1.6 gallons) + (2 additional flushes x 1.6 gallons) = 11.2 gallons / day per person

11.2 gallons / day x 4 people = 44.8 gallons / day

44.8 gallons / day x 365 days = 16,352 gallons / year

Caroma Dual Flush Toilet uses 0.8 gallon for liquid and 1.6 gallons for bulk:

(4 liquid flushes x 0.8 gallon) + (1 bulk flush x 1.6 gallons) = 4.8 gallons / day per person

4.8 gallons / day x 4 people = 19.2 gallons / day

19.2 gallons / day x 365 days = 7,008 gallons / year

So, with a Caroma Dual Flush Toilet from ConserveIQ, this family will save 9,344 gallons of water per year! That’s 57.1% water savings!

If this toilet was in Houston, the average cost of residential water is $0.007894026 / gallon, as of September 2009.

That’s 9,344 gallons x $0.007894026 = $73.76

So, by changing to a Caroma Dual Flush Toilet from ConserveIQ, this family will save $73.76 per year!*

1.6 Gallons per Flush LEVER toilet where there is only 1 Double Flush per family member (uses 1.6 gallons per flush on every flush):

(4 liquid flushes x 1.6 gallons) + (1 bulk flush x 1.6 gallons) + (1 additional flush x 1.6 gallons) = 9.6 gallons / day per person

9.6 gallons / day x 4 people = 38.4 gallons / day

38.4 gallons / day x 365 days = 14,016 gallons / year

Caroma Dual Flush Toilet uses 0.8 gallon for liquid and 1.6 gallons for bulk:

(4 liquid flushes x 0.8 gallon) + (1 bulk flush x 1.6 gallons) = 4.8 gallons / day per person

4.8 gallons / day x 4 people = 19.2 gallons / day

19.2 gallons / day x 365 days = 7,008 gallons / year

So, with a Caroma Dual Flush Toilet from ConserveIQ, this family will save 7,008 gallons of water per year! That’s 50% water savings!

If this toilet was in Houston, the average cost of residential water is $0.007894026 / gallon, as of September 2009.

That’s 29,492 gallons x $0.007894026 = $55.32

So, by changing to a Caroma Dual Flush Toilet from ConserveIQ, this family will save $55.32 per year!*

1.6 Gallons per Flush toilet and NO ONE EVER Double Flushes (uses 1.6 gallons per flush on every flush):

(4 liquid flushes x 1.6 gallons) + (1 bulk flush x 1.6 gallons) = 8 gallons / day per person

8 gallons / day x 4 people = 32 gallons / day

32 gallons / day x 365 days = 11,680 gallons / year

Caroma Dual Flush Toilet uses 0.8 gallon for liquid and 1.6 gallons for bulk:

(4 liquid flushes x 0.8 gallon) + (1 bulk flush x 1.6 gallons) = 4.8 gallons / day per person

4.8 gallons / day x 4 people = 19.2 gallons / day

19.2 gallons / day x 365 days = 7,008 gallons / year

So, with a Caroma Dual Flush Toilet from ConserveIQ, this family will save 4,672 gallons of water per year! That’s 40% water savings!

If this toilet was in Houston, the average cost of residential water is $0.007894026 / gallon, as of September 2009.

That’s 4,672 gallons x $0.007894026 = $36.88

So, by changing to a Caroma Dual Flush Toilet from ConserveIQ, this family will save $36.88 per year!*

Those are real life savings calculations, based on Houston area data.

Another important Calculation:

Caroma 4” Trapway + Throw My Plunger Away + Peace of Mind = “Complete Happiness”

That means, in addition to keeping you and your family happier about flushing and not having to use the dreaded plunger like in the past, you will also have your Caroma toilet compensate you for its purchase price as it continues to save you water and money for years. You’ll continue to pocket savings throughout the years through additional water savings!

Conserve…it’s only logical. Contact us to place your order today! We have Caroma Dual Flush Toilets, plus many more products that will help you conserve!

Posted in Bathroom Products, Water Savings

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About the Author
Leading the way for conservation is the ConserveIQ Professor and President, Scott von Gonten. He is not only a Certified Green Professional, he is also an approved instructor for Green Building. Learn more about the ConserveIQ Professor.

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